A Golden Day

I love these warm and golden rays

Which find me on these gorgeous days.

With soft sky blue the sun shines through,

It then resolves my thoughts to you.

 

This shining sun becomes your smile

Which warms this frozen heart.

It pulls me to a comfort zone,

Although we’re worlds apart.

 

The blue sky’s warmth makes me fond

Of the times when I’m with you.

Reminiscing how I look into your eyes

And know that dreams come true.

 

I’ll find you on these perfect days -

Wherever you may be.

I’ll hope to God you feel it too,

And that it brings you back to me.

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The Controversy and History of Gun Control (Research Paper)

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

That is the 2nd of 10 amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America which were ratified on December 15, 1791 to form what we call the “Bill of Rights”. [National Archives and Records Administration] I will not add my opinion to this right given to the people of the United States, it is open for interpretation but I take it at face value. With that said, our country faces a problem with violence and the use of firearms. Many leaders of congress and lobbyists around the country are calling for, and demanding gun control including the banning of certain – if not all guns. Guns kill people? I think not. Guns are objects that require a person to pull the trigger and inflict damage. I say that gun control will not prevent crime, violence, nor will it effectively decrease the murder rate, rather it would actually cause a rise in such. I will be providing an in depth investigation with an overview/background of gun control issues, gun violence, as well as the law enforcement/criminal justice system aspect of gun control. Beyond that I will also be looking at possible common sense solutions that may potentially help to improve the current violence crisis we have in America.

To begin the discussion of gun control I am providing an overview/background of the issues of gun control. This overview will include history, laws, and the National Rifle Association (NRA) with its role in gun control; this will not be too in depth as it is an overview. I would count the history of the “gun control” issue to start back when the first gun was created, but for the sake of the issue and keeping it more specific to our American population I will say it begins with the Englishman and his rifle from the time they stepped foot into “The New World”. It’s so evident in every history book that the gun has been a part of our American culture since before our country declared independence. The importance of guns was made even more clear with the second amendment of which I began this discussion. However that right has since been heavily debated – especially in more recent times. Of course a loose constitutionalist sees what the writing DOESN’T say, whereas a strict constitutionalist sees only what it DOES, this is one reason for such intense rhetoric. Here of late we’ve witnessed many tragedies including Virginia Tech, Tucson (involving Representative Gabrielle Giffords), the Trayvin Martin shooting, Aurora Colorado, and Sandy Hook. So many tragedies caused by people using guns of some sort. Obviously there are laws against such violence, and there are certainly measures of “gun control” in place which brings me to some of the laws and legislation. In the State of New York they passed the Sullivan Act in 1911 which was essentially a concealed carry law that required a permit to carry or own a weapon small enough to be concealed. This law was passed after a high profile shooting of a well known novelist, and of course there was controversy over this law and the many laws regarding guns. After a few high profile crimes that involved fully automatic weapons The National Firearms Act (NFA) was passed in 1934 as the first national gun control law. The NFA imposed taxes on the manufacture and sale of certain firearms, and it was designed to make it difficult to gain access to “especially lethal” firearms; this is still in effect today. The Federal Firearms Act was passed in 1938 requiring sellers to maintain records and obtain a Federal Firearms License. Because of the series of politically motivated assassinations in the 1960′s (JFK, MLK Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy) President Johnson signed the Gun Control Act as a law. This very heavily regulated firearms in America adding many restrictions on gun sales, and required more detailed records by sellers. After the attempt to assassinate President Reagan which left his White House Press Secretary James Brady permanently disabled there was more anti-gun protests. Brady’s wife was very vocal in the matter and introduced the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act also known as the Brady Bill in 1987. President Bill Clinton signed the Brady Bill as law on November 30, 1993 and it imposed a mandatory 5 day waiting period on firearm purchases and required thorough background checks to be carried out by local law enforcement on anyone wanting to buy a weapon. The Supreme Court ruled in 1997 that the US Government exceeded its authority and that the background checks were unconstitutional under the 10th amendment which restricts the federal government from having authority over the states. Even though they made this ruling, other parts of the Brady Bill remained in effect. Then in 1994 President Clinton signed a second law, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, which prohibited the sale of semiautomatic weapons with magazines that hold 10 rounds or more for civilian use. The bill was not renewed in 2004, after 10 years. In even more recent years we have more proposed legislation such as the Gun Show Background Check Act, and the Denying Firearms and Explosives to Dangerous Criminals Act both of which ultimately went nowhere. Then there of course is the controversy over the “stand your ground” laws which were brought to attention in the shooting of Trayvon Martin in 2012 in Florida. Florida was the first state to pass this law in 2005 and it allows you to justifiably use force in self defense if there is an imminent threat of an unlawful act and it doesn’t not require you to retreat first. a big factor in gun laws is the National Rifle Association (NRA), this group was formed in 1871 and has been dedicated to promoting the rights of gun owners for 140 years. In 1975 the NRA decided to create the Institution for Legislation Action (ILA) which was a group intending to increase the NRA’s influence with the government. The year they formed they found their first victory against a law that would label handgun ammunition as “hazardous substance” so that it would be banned by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

My next objective is to bring you up to date with gun violence in and of itself. I’ve already mentioned some of the bigger more notable tragedies involving guns that we are all familiar with, but now I am going to talk more specifically in regards to statistics including Chicago (gun free zone), concealed carry zones/states, and I’ll share my opinion about ways that acts of mass violence could easily be prevented. I will begin with the city of Chicago which is often brought up in gun control rhetoric. All you really have to do is type “Chicago gun control” into Google and you’ll find a plethora of results regarding the rising crime rates and rates of violence involving guns. The shocker is that this city has some of the nation’s strictest gun control laws, but because it’s more difficult for Chicagoans to legally own and carry weapons for self defense, they are unable to effectively protect themselves in situations that police cannot. CNS News reports that there have been 441 shooting and 100 homicides in Chicago since January 1st 2013, the math is 3.8 shootings per day or about one shooting every 6.3 hours. In 2012, 2,670 people were shot in Chicago – up 20% from 2011 and the homicide rate was also up 21% from 2011 to 2012. [Gregory Gwyn-Williams, Jr., "Chicago Suffering One Shooting Every 6.3 Hours as 2013 Homicide Count Hits 100", cnsnews.com, April 26th, 2013]. In 1981 nineteen states did not allow citizens to carry concealed weapons – they were considered “no carry” states, D.C. also was a “no carry” zone. Just two states were in the “shall issue” category which allows gun owners who meet minimum qualifications to carry their weapons concealed. There were twenty eight states at that time which “may issue” leaving them with the ultimate discretion to say yay or nay as to whether someone can carry their weapon concealed. Vermont was then the only state that did not require a permit to conceal carry a weapon. Since then it has actually changed drastically, now a total of four states don’t require a permit. Thirty five states now have “shall issue” laws, from twenty eight down to just nine states with “may issue” laws, and only one state still prohibits the carrying of concealed weapons. Would you like to take a guess at which state? I’ll give you a hint, it’s home to Chicago. That’s right, Illinois is the only state with no carry laws in addition to the D.C. area as well. It is clear that concealed-carry laws have swept through the nation in the past twenty two years pushing from just two “shall issue” states to thirty five. It’s clear that the “right-to-carry” laws have loosened up incredibly over the past 30 years. Now this ties into my common sense beliefs and opinions of how so many acts of violence could be easily prevented. In most instances of violence you don’t hear of concealed-carry permit holders creating acts of violence, usually it is a criminal with a prior record, also typically a stolen gun. There are quite a few instances where it is an act of passion “heat of the moment” type of situation by someone who has no history of violence. Also in most instances mental health is not really an issue, you typically hear people who know the perpetrators saying things like “there’s no way so and so did this”. People in sociology say it has to do with social forces that play in their life and eventually push them to acts of violence. If someone has a gun and is trying to rob you, what are you going to do? Give the person your money, become a victim and then proceed by calling the police? By the time the police show up the perpetrator will be long gone and chances are that 45 minute justice you see on law and order will never happen. If your life is on the line at the command of a gunman, you can defend yourself if you are armed with a gun as well. There are distinct ecological patterns that are correlated with crime rates. Rural and suburban areas have much lower crime rates than the large metropolitan areas which shows that urban problems including overcrowding, poverty, social inequality, narcotics use, and racial conflict are related to crime rates. This might be a factor as to why Chicago has such a high rate of gun violence as well – couple that with unarmed law abiding citizens who can’t effectively protect themselves and you have a recipe for tragedy. Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the NRA stated, “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.” I firmly believe such. There are countless cases of concealed-carry citizens who stop crime all around the country on random occasions. If it weren’t for these people there would be even higher crime rates. The truth is that no matter how much gun control or restrictions are put in place those measures won’t stop a criminal – that’s why they’re criminals. They have no respect for the law, but broadening laws so that they put more Americans in violation of it simply creates more criminals and puts more stress on an already over-worked over-stressed criminal justice system.

That leads me to my final topic of discussion: Law Enforcement and the Criminal Justice System. Professor of Criminology, Gary D. Kleck, of Florida State University says “There’s no conceivable way that a federal ban (of assault weapons) could save a single life or prevent a single injury, unless you’re willing to believe that there are criminals committed solely to using one of these particular models, and not mechanically identical models among the 600 other unregulated assault weapons”. The problem is not necessarily the types of weapons, but stopping people who have illegally obtained them, or really have no right to own them. Criminals with violent records should not have weapons, but they do. So we focus instead on getting rid of weapons from all Americans, rather than focusing on stopping these violent criminals? Acts of violence are obviously illegal, but so many perpetrators enter the criminal justice system and find a plea bargain rather than truly being punished to the fullest extent of the law. Law enforcement officers can only do something when the crime is reported and already happened, the prevention comes through deterrent by way of increased police presence and proactive policing, or even better – allowing citizens to carry their guns. When criminals know that people aren’t allowed to have guns they would be less likely to target people in an area where concealed-carry is flourishing. Violent offenders should not be let off the hook with a slap on the wrist. Recidivism is very high in all areas because so many judges are so soft in rulings (assuming the ones without trials by jury) and the criminals get out in a month or two and go commit the crime again. Also it’s most likely that if the perpetrator isn’t apprehended right on the scene, (s)he won’t be captured. Police Departments have minimum funding, and face increasing budget cuts, this affects the cases their detectives take, the manpower they have available, and the resources that are available.

I’ve provided an extensive overview/background of gun control issues, gun violence, as well as the law enforcement/criminal justice system aspect of gun control. I’ll end by saying that there are many common sense things that can be done to help reduce gun violence in our country, whether it be strengthening the laws we already have by being stern in punishment in the criminal justice system, or just educating citizens and allowing them to conceal-carry to provide protection and live free of fear. The answer will never be to infringe on the right of the people to bear arms, it is unconstitutional and never the solution.

Works Cited

“Gun Control: Update.” Issues & Controversies. Facts On File News Services, 17 Dec. 2012. Web. 8 Apr. 2013.

Mantel, Barbara. “Gun Control.” CQ Researcher 8 Mar. 2013: 233-56. Web. 8 Apr. 2013.

Jost, Kenneth. “Gun Control Standoff.” CQ Researcher 19 Dec. 1997: 1105-28. Web. 8 Apr. 2013.

Worsnop, Richard L. “Gun Control.” CQ Researcher 10 June 1994: 505-28. Web. 8 Apr. 2013.

Larry J. Siegel, John L. Worrall, Essentials of Criminal Justice, 8th Edition, 2013

Alpers, Philip and Marcus Wilson. 2013. Guns in the United States: Facts, Figures and Firearm Law.Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney. GunPolicy.org, 14 March. Accessed 8 April 2013.

Frank Zimring, Is Gun Control Likely to Reduce Violent Killings?, The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Summer, 1968), pp. 721-737, Published by: The University of Chicago Law Review, Stable

Gun Control and Problems in Policing

There are many problems in the profession of police officers, day-to-day issues, and issues on a larger scale. Most of these problems however, affect all officers that work each day. I’m going to be discussing a handful of problems they face in particular, these problems include: gun violence/gun control, the need for professionalism, fatigue, and job stress. I will define each problem, provide a historical overview as well as a scope of the problem, I will discuss why each problem matters, how they’re being dealt with, and the future in regards to the problems.

I will begin with the issue of gun violence/gun control which is currently a fairly heavy topic of discussion, especially in congress. I will be giving a rather in-depth overview because I believe that this is one of the biggest problems and it is one reason why being a police officer is the most dangerous job in America. On January 12, 1998 Deputy Kyle Wayne Dinkheller was at the end of his shift and getting ready to go off duty when he pulled a motorist over for speeding. This should have been a very routine traffic stop, and the motorist could have been on his way in no time, but instead it went in a very different direction. The motorist/perpetrator, Andrew Brannan – a Vietnam veteran decided to argue verbally and curse telling the deputy “shoot me! Shoot me!” The perpetrator headed away from the deputy while the deputy continued to give commands while calling for backup. The perpetrator reached across his pickup truck and picked up his rifle, the deputy then ordered him to put it down. The perpetrator fired shots and the deputy fired back, unfortunately the deputy missed through an entire clip on his service pistol and had to reload, the perpetrator chased the deputy around his car. The deputy can be heard screaming for his life on the dash cam footage, he manages to hit the perpetrator in his stomach but it would not be enough. The deputy was hit several times in exposed areas such as the stomach and arms, the suspect fired two more rounds after he was hit in the stomach. Both rounds struck Deputy Dinkheller in the head killing him. The suspect fled the scene and was arrested the next day, eventually he was sentenced to death as the jury found that the murder was carried out in a cruel and torturous manner. The video is the most chilling footage I’ve personally ever seen and is used all across the country in police academies for training purposes. This is just one example of how the gun problem affects law enforcement officers on a day-to-day basis. All it takes is one traffic stop and one moment for everything to go wrong.

Now, allow me to provide an extensive overview/background of the issues of gun control. I would say that gun violence has been around (obviously) since the time that guns were invented, thus it has always presented a problem as well as the need for a solution to the problem. It’s so evident in every history book that the gun has been a part of our American culture since before our country declared independence. The importance of guns was made even more clear with the second amendment of our constitution, however that right has since been heavily debated – especially in more recent times. Here of late we’ve witnessed many tragedies including Virginia Tech, Tucson (involving Representative Gabrielle Giffords), the Trayvin Martin shooting, Aurora Colorado, and Sandy Hook. So many tragedies caused by people using guns of some sort. Obviously there are laws against such violence, and there are certainly measures of “gun control” in place which brings me to some of the laws and legislation. The first legislation of gun control was in the State of New York they passed the Sullivan Act in 1911 which was essentially a concealed carry law that required a permit to carry or own a weapon small enough to be concealed. After a few high-profile crimes that involved fully automatic weapons The National Firearms Act (NFA) was passed in 1934 as the first national gun control law. The NFA imposed taxes on the manufacture and sale of certain firearms, and it was designed to make it difficult to gain access to “especially lethal” firearms; this is still in effect today. The Federal Firearms Act was passed in 1938 requiring sellers to maintain records and obtain a Federal Firearms License. Because of the series of politically motivated assassinations in the 1960′s (JFK, MLK Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy) President Johnson signed the Gun Control Act as a law. This very heavily regulated firearms in America adding many restrictions on gun sales, and required more detailed records by sellers. After the attempt to assassinate President Reagan which left his White House Press Secretary James Brady permanently disabled there was more anti-gun protests. Brady’s wife was very vocal in the matter and introduced the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act also known as the Brady Bill in 1987. President Bill Clinton signed the Brady Bill as law on November 30, 1993 and it imposed a mandatory 5 day waiting period on firearm purchases and required thorough background checks to be carried out by local law enforcement on anyone wanting to buy a weapon. The Supreme Court ruled in 1997 that the US Government exceeded its authority and that the background checks were unconstitutional under the 10th amendment which restricts the federal government from having authority over the states. Even though they made this ruling, other parts of the Brady Bill remained in effect. Then in 1994 President Clinton signed a second law, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, which prohibited the sale of semiautomatic weapons with magazines that hold 10 rounds or more for civilian use. The bill was not renewed in 2004, after 10 years. In even more recent years we have more proposed legislation such as the Gun Show Background Check Act, and the Denying Firearms and Explosives to Dangerous Criminals Act both of which ultimately went nowhere. a big factor in gun laws is the National Rifle Association (NRA), this group was formed in 1871 and has been dedicated to promoting the rights of gun owners for 140 years. In 1975 the NRA decided to create the Institution for Legislation Action (ILA) which was a group intending to increase the NRA’s influence with the government. The year they formed they found their first victory against a law that would label handgun ammunition as “hazardous substance” so that it would be banned by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. I’d like to talk more specifically in regards to statistics including Chicago (gun free zone), and concealed carry zones/states. I will begin with the city of Chicago which is often brought up in gun control rhetoric. All you really have to do is type “Chicago gun control” into Google and you’ll find a plethora of results regarding the rising crime rates and rates of violence involving guns. The shocker is that this city has some of the nation’s strictest gun control laws, but because it’s more difficult for Chicagoans to legally own and carry weapons for self-defense, they are unable to effectively protect themselves in situations that police cannot. CNS News reports that there have been 441 shooting and 100 homicides in Chicago since January 1st 2013, the math is 3.8 shootings per day or about one shooting every 6.3 hours. In 2012, 2,670 people were shot in Chicago – up 20% from 2011 and the homicide rate was also up 21% from 2011 to 2012. [Gregory Gwyn-Williams, Jr., "Chicago Suffering One Shooting Every 6.3 Hours as 2013 Homicide Count Hits 100", cnsnews.com, April 26th, 2013].

In 1981 nineteen states did not allow citizens to carry concealed weapons – they were considered “no carry” states, D.C. also was a “no carry” zone. Just two states were in the “shall issue” category which allows gun owners who meet minimum qualifications to carry their weapons concealed. There were twenty-eight states at that time which “may issue” leaving them with the ultimate discretion to say yay or nay as to whether someone can carry their weapon concealed. Vermont was then the only state that did not require a permit to conceal carry a weapon. Since then it has actually changed drastically, now a total of four states don’t require a permit. Thirty five states now have “shall issue” laws, from twenty-eight down to just nine states with “may issue” laws, and only one state still prohibits the carrying of concealed weapons. Would you like to take a guess at which state? I’ll give you a hint, it’s home to Chicago. That’s right, Illinois is the only state with no carry laws in addition to the D.C. area as well. It is clear that concealed-carry laws have swept through the nation in the past twenty-two years pushing from just two “shall issue” states to thirty-five. It’s clear that the “right-to-carry” laws have loosened up incredibly over the past 30 years.

When it comes down to it, the only thing that can really be done with so many weapons available both legally and illegally is for police officers to continue their daily war against crime and be super careful and prepared to put up a fight to protect themselves and the citizens against the violence of guns.

My next topic of discussion is the need for professionalism in policing. This is actually a huge problem and it is one of the reasons the standards for hiring police officers have been raised. Professionalism is the conduct, aims, or qualities that characterize or mark a profession or a professional person. Police officers are to the community as ministers/preachers are to their congregation/parishioners, and are similar in some broad ways. Ministers are expected to righteous and as close to perfect as possible (in theory), and police officers are supposed to uphold the law in the same manner. The media and the public are very critical of police officers so it is ever so important for police officers to be calm, cool, and collective in any given situation. They should always be respectful whether it be a suspect, prisoner, citizen, or victim. Police officers should be outstanding in communicating and problem solving and should always act with integrity. Unfortunately things like brutality and corruptness play into professionalism, these are things that are obviously very unprofessional and this is where a lot of the problem with professionalism lies. The only ways to really deal with it are by a case to case basis, officer complaints, acts of unnecessary brutality, etc. All police departments have some form of a code of conduct for how their officers shall behave in given circumstances, if they aren’t followed by the officer there should be disciplinary actions taken.

My third topic of discussion is fatigue, this is a rather problematic issue in policing. It’s all fine and dandy if someone falls asleep in the office, in their cozy seat at a desk in front of a computer full of random information that has to do with their job, but when you fall asleep behind the wheel of a vehicle or behind the controls of an airplane, or things of this nature, there is a huge, huge problem. Officers have a higher risk of being injured or acting inappropriately on the job when they are overly tired.

Interestingly, the Boston Globe did an investigation of an agency and came to the realization that sixteen police officers had worked more than eighty hours in a week and one officer had worked one hundred and thirty hours! Just think about that for a moment, an officer worked one hundred and thirty hours in one week. If you do the math on that, the officer worked about 18.57 hours per day for seven days straight, he would only get 5.43 hours of sleep per night. Fatigue creates major safety problems which could potentially be fatal for police officers. A way to help prevent this problem is for administrators to make sure that officers aren’t working too much overtime. That is one simple solution, another would be to of course monitor the officers. There are simple solutions to the problem that just need to be taken care of.

Job stress for police officers is overwhelming, it causes a disproportional number of divorces, marital problems, and even higher suicide rates compared to the general public. Being on the job twenty-four hours a day causes stress and even emotional detachment from work and the needs of the public. Some other reasons for stress are poor training, fears of competence, safety, and success, exposure to brutality, job dissatisfaction, role conflict, lack of opportunity, substandard equipment, and inadequate pay. Clearly there are many things that can cause the stress of police officers, even that they may believe that the court system favors the rights of the criminals. Police work has been known to cause problems with both psychological and physical problems. Some officers experience burn out, and many even become cynical of their job and the people they encounter. Some departments are trying to fight job-related stress by training their officers to be able to cope with the effects of stress. Some departments even offer stress management as a part of an overall wellness program. These stress reduction programs can become a great way to help police officers focus on the positive aspects of policing.

Works Cited

Gregory Gwyn-Williams, Jr., “Chicago Suffering One Shooting Every 6.3 Hours as 2013 Homicide Count Hits 100″, cnsnews.com, April 26th, 2013

Larry J. Siegel, John L. Worrall, Essentials of Criminal Justice, 8th Edition, 2013, pages 127-131, Book.

Mantel, Barbara. “Gun Control.” CQ Researcher 8 Mar. 2013: 233-56. Web. 8 Apr. 2013.

My Favorite Things

A calm snow drifts to ground, in a hushed-silent night;
This heart so still content, there’ll be no ode to fright.
Tis the season to be jolly, we gain such joy and great delight;
Our minds rejoice for lack of plight, and find new refuge in season’s sights.

This season brings such brilliant gifts, and people who will give;
The gift of best this winter, is the Son of God who lives.
Love is found abundant – wrapped within our hearts;
And this love so soon unravels, once this season starts.

The sound of carols fill my ears, as a smile steals my face;
Hot cocoa brings much satisfaction, with the warmth of the fireplace.
Even warmer is the love of family, as we gather from miles with cheer;
And that cozy-home feeling deep in my stomach, just knowing my loved ones are near.

I retreat outdoors. Silent. Still. Dark, this night.
As the moon so full, breaks clouds to make way for light.
Twinkle twinkle little star, if only you weren’t up so far;
I wish I may I wish with might, for this world to stop and bask in your delight.

The earth gives no motion, as I stand beneath the heavens;
A world at rest – in and out I see my breath, while the snow glows all around me;
Withering flakes of damp fluffy snow continue their downward fall.
And I’m frozen in time with a soul in awe; calm is this night, this season, this heart.
Calm is all.

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Time

I see what once was,
As it’s gone now with time;
I see what time does,
I watch it unwind.

It twists and turns and runs away,
Where does time go?
Who would have me say?

Answer I have not,
Just like my time;
For it burdens my heart,
As it burdens my mind.

All things change,
With the tick of the clock;
Things disappear ,
Life erodes like a rock.

Time is gone much like yesterday,
Nothing I can do to reattain.
My dreams disperse
As I see life reverse,
But time would surely not.

I cannot change time,
Without regards to how hard I try;
For time is a vapor -
A mist on the wind.

I’ll never get back what once used to be,
I’ll never get back to being old me;
Nor will I find a place to see,
What would’ve – what could’ve set my time free.

But time will rule a troubled heart,
Time will rule all life;
Time will bring you lots of joy,
And strike you with its strife.

I haven’t the strength to stop its tick,
Or rewind what’s been done;
It’s a battle none could ever fight,
For time’s war has already been won.

Lockegee AAC

The beauty of the scene surrounds me
As the wind trickles by
The sun sets off to the west
As the moon hangs high in the sky

Up on this rock with you, my dear
As night time falls, no end draws near
The stars set up for a grand display
Here with you is where I’ll stay.

I look to your eyes as you look at me
And know in my heart you see what I see
And feel this abundance of blooming new love
Where else would we be when push comes to shove?

Only with you would I share in this spot
And I’ll give you my heart cause its all that I’ve got.
These heart strings you pull and you pull all so well
Wherever this leads us, only time can tell.

On every star above you I know I’ve already wished
Wished for you to come to me
I wished it weren’t a glitch.

I’ve waited all my life for this wonderful girl named you
To stroll right in and tell me
That my dreams really do come true.

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